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Tag Archives: Nautical terms

Nautical phrases – yachtspeak – for charter guests

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NAUTICAL TERMINOLOGY

Taking a vacation by automobile doesn’t require any particular vocabulary skills.  However, when you go on a private yacht charter, it is sometimes nice to know some of the terminology used when onboard.

SAMPLE NAUTICAL TERMS

  • BOW – The forward part of a boat
  • STERN – The back of the boat
  • BEAM – The greatest width of the boat
  • BUOY – An anchored float used for marking a position on the water or a hazard or a shoal and for mooring
  • CABIN (or “stateroom”) – A compartment (bedroom) for passengers or crew
  • CATAMARAN – A twin-hulled boat, sometimes referred to as a multihull, with hulls side-by-side.  Can be sail or power, but is usually sail
  • CHART – A map for use by navigators
  • HELM (or “Navigation Station”) – The area from where the Captain steers the boat
  • CLEAT – A fitting to which lines are tied.  They are usually in somewhat of a “figure 8 shape.” Cleats are located on the dock and on the boat. (They are often tripped over, if you don’t watch your step!)
  • COCKPIT – An opening in the deck from which the boat is handled. (Visualize a large sailboat – the “steering wheel” of the boat is located in the cockpit)
  • DINGHY (also known as a “tender”) – A small open boat
  • “T/T BOATNAME” – Means “Tender To…[boatname].”   NOTE: Most yachts only have 1 tender.  Those with more than 1 tender (aka, dinghy) often have “TTT’s….or tenders for/to their tenders”
  • FENDER (also known as a “bumper”) – A cushion, placed between boats, or between a boat and a pier, to prevent damage

nautical terms - photograph of fenders, protection, hanging on the side of yachts that protects the boats from hitting against each other

 

 

  • GALLEY – The kitchen of a boat
  • SAILBOAT – A boat powered by wind through sails (with ancillary engine)
  • POWERBOAT – A boat powered by engine and fuel
  • STINKPOTTER – A powerboat enthusiast
  • HEAD – A marine toilet/bathroom
  • DAY HEAD – The bathroom that is used by all guests, usually in main area of the boat and not located within a stateroom
  • INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY – Also known as “The ICW.”  Bays, rivers, and canals along the coasts (such as the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts), connected so that vessels may travel without going into the sea.  Evening charters in Florida often cruise along the ICW to see the holiday lights of the condos lining the waterway, for example
  • KNOT (relating to speed) – A measure of speed equal to one nautical mile (6076 feet) per hour
  • LOG – A record of courses or operation, kept by the captain/crew. (Charter guests often fill out an entry in a “guestbook” or “logbook” after a charter, as well, to describe their trip)
  • PLANING (“on a plane”) – As a boat evens out above the water when it is moving/underway, as opposed to still being partially underneath the water, as in before it starts moving
  • PORT – The left side of a boat looking forward. (Also refers to a docking location)
  • STARBOARD – The right side of a boat, looking forward
  • SCREW – A boat’s propeller.  (A “twin screw” is a boat with 2 propellers.)
  • UNDERWAY – Vessel in motion (also known as “running”)
  • WAKE – Moving waves, track, or path that a boat leaves behind it, when moving across the water
  • YACHT – A boat used for pleasure

These are just a few of the many nautical phrases used by yachties.

PRACTICE NAUTICAL PHRASES WITH US

To book your private luxury yacht charter vacation (and practice your “yachtspeak”), contact 1-800-YACHTCHARTERS by phone via 1-800-YACHTCHARTERS or 305-253-7245, by email via info@1800yachtcharters.com, via twitter @yacht_charters (follow us!), or finally, contact us via our online form at https://www.1800yachtcharters.com/book-now-contact-us/

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Who Knew???  Famous Phrases with Nautical Yachting Origins

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Many years ago, when we first started blogging about private luxury yacht charters, we would get bored writing about the same topics over and over –  “Here’s a new sailboat…,”  “Here’s a new motoryacht…,”  “Here’s a fun destination…”     Blah, blah, blah…

To jazz things up, our company President, Jana Sheeder would sometimes write blogs about off-the-wall, mostly nautical-themed trivia, which she labeled, “Did You Know…?

I thought I would take a stab at it myself.  So here goes…

DID YOU KNOW these common phrases all have nautical roots?

 

 

cup of coffee with white cup and saucer

Cup of Joe:

When newly appointed Secretary of the Navy Joe Daniels took his post in 1913, he banned wine and spirits aboard ships. So, the strongest drink aboard Navy ships was coffee.   Over the years, a cup of coffee became known as “a cup of Joe.”

 

 

brown and white guinea pig in a hammock with back legs sticking out

 

Shake a Leg:

This one is a little sketchy so I picked the explanation that sounded the best to me.  Some sources claim the phrase originates from the British Royal Navy.  Supposedly, officers would order sleeping sailors to throw a leg out from their hammocks to wake up! (Just a fun image…little guinea pig looks exhausted!)

 

a flying black crow on a sky blue background

 

 

As the Crow Flies:

In the 1700’s it was thought (and possibly true) crows like to be on dry land and will fly straight to shore, bypassing any obstacles in their path.  Ships would carry crows aboard, and in cases of poor visibility, let one free and chart the bird’s flight to shore.   [Sounds cool, but I’ll stick to Google Maps!]

 

Our modern fleet of private luxury yacht charter vessels serve way more than just coffee, and the crows have all been replaced with state-of-the-art radar and global navigation software!  Come enjoy the Superyacht Experience with your family and friends and book a yachting vacation today, with 1-800 Yacht Charters. Fill out our convenient online booking form at https://www.1800yachtcharters.com/book-now-contact-us/

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